Code of ethics

At Ifergan Gallery we have a strict ethical code so that buying archaeology is safe for our clients. Prior to its acquisition, we ensure that the pieces comply with the international laws of protection of the historical and cultural heritage of UNESCO. We guarantee that none of them has been stolen from excavations, architectural monuments, public institutions or private properties.

All our pieces are delivered with their corresponding Export Certificate issued by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports of the Government of Spain.

In addition, to ensure the maximum satisfaction of our customers we require museum quality level.

We guarantee that the pieces we offer are as they are seen in the photographs and correspond with their description.

Authenticity

Our pieces come entirely from the most renowned auction houses around the world such as Christie's, Bonhams or Pierre Bergé, as well as from the most prestigious international galleries. Therefore, the quality and authenticity of the pieces is guaranteed, providing each with its corresponding certificate of authenticity. In addition, we work with tools such as Thermoluminescence or Carbon 14 tests to certify their age.

Returns

At Ifergan Gallery we are concerned about the satisfaction of our customers. To guarantee it, the client may return the piece within fifteen calendar days of its reception.
In addition, all our shipments are made with the appropriate packaging that guarantees reception in optimal conditions. Packages are also sent with their corresponding accident insurance.

Egyptian linen cover for Harpakhem, Late Period-Roman Period, 664 B.C. – 200 A.D.

This linen covering belongs to a set of nine bandages from the same mummy, which, thanks to the inscriptions on these bandages, has been identified as Harpakhem. The bandages come from the same sheet made of pure linen, which provides a robust but flexible texture. The inscriptions are made with a black ink that is well preserved since the scribe did not change his brush at any time, so the bandages did not suffer the corrosive effect of too thick ink.
The inscriptions on the bandages are passages from the Book of the Dead, so that a correlative text is created for the bandages where there are references to chapters 158, 160, 163 and 164.

In the case of bandage number 5, it is the continuation of bandage number 4, possibly because both were originally part of a single strip of cloth which could have been separated into two pieces by accident or because it was more convenient for embalmers. The text written on this band is an excerpt from Chapter 163, which comprises a rather long spell intended to ensure the physical preservation of the deceased, general well-being and freedom of action in the afterlife.

Roman amphora type Dressel 2-4 of terracotta, High Imperial Period, 1st-2nd century A.D.

The morphology of Dressel 2-4 amphoras is characterized by a thickened rim towards the outside, a long truncated cone or cylindrical neck, and a generally cylindrical body, although it sometimes has a fusiform or ovoid morphology, and rests on a solid pivot. The handles have a characteristic forked section and a right-angled profile, and rest on the shoulders, which usually have a marked hump. The forerunners of amphoras were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman worlds, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to store them. Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their shape varying depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Phoenician amphora of terracotta, 4th century B.C.

Amphoras are fusiform ceramic vessels with two handles and a narrow neck generally, although in some cultures they have developed in metal or other materials. They are usually finished with a point or even a long protruding tip that was used to stick them into the ground and keep them stable.

Their precursors were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman world, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to be able to store them.

Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their form being variable depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Greek amphora of terracotta, 4th century B.C.

Amphoras are fusiform ceramic vessels with two handles and a narrow neck generally, although in some cultures they have developed in metal or other materials. They are usually finished with a point or even a long protruding tip that was used to stick them into the ground and keep them stable.

Their precursors were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman world, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to be able to store them.

Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their form being variable depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Roman amphora type Dressel 2-4 of terracotta, High Imperial Period, 1st-2nd century A.D.

The morphology of Dressel 2-4 amphoras is characterized by a thickened rim towards the outside, a long truncated cone or cylindrical neck, and a generally cylindrical body, although it sometimes has a fusiform or ovoid morphology, and rests on a solid pivot. The handles have a characteristic forked section and a right-angled profile, and rest on the shoulders, which usually have a marked hump. The forerunners of amphoras were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman worlds, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to store them. Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their shape varying depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Phoenician amphora of terracotta, 4th century B.C.

Amphoras are fusiform ceramic vessels with two handles and a narrow neck generally, although in some cultures they have developed in metal or other materials. They are usually finished with a point or even a long protruding tip that was used to stick them into the ground and keep them stable.

Their precursors were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman world, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to be able to store them.

Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their form being variable depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Greek amphora of terracotta, 4th century B.C.

Amphoras are fusiform ceramic vessels with two handles and a narrow neck generally, although in some cultures they have developed in metal or other materials. They are usually finished with a point or even a long protruding tip that was used to stick them into the ground and keep them stable.

Their precursors were the Greeks, although they soon spread throughout the Phoenician and Roman world, being used to transport liquids and food, as well as to be able to store them.

Normally they could contain at least 25 to 30 litres, their form being variable depending on whether they were carrying wine, oil, salt, cereals or other food.

Egyptian faience bead mask, Late Period, 664-332 B.C.

This funeral mask is made with faince beads of different colours linked with linen thread and is bordered with a zigzag edge around it made in this case with elongated beads. This mask would be placed over the facial area of the mummy and is a relatively rare type.
The head of the deceased is represented in a schematic way, possibly because of the limitation imposed by the very use of the beads or the desire for an idealized representation of the character. They all share common features such as large eyes framed by well-delineated eyebrows and a nose of considerable size. They also share the detail of having the neck adorned with a necklace made of faience beads and the fact of having the head naked, without the traditional Egyptian headdress.

 

Egyptian-Roman relief of Augustus offering libations to the god Meruel, Limestone, Roman period, 27 BC

In this relief, Octavian Augustus is already represented as a pharaoh, protected by the symbol Sa and offering libations to the god Meruel (Mandulis in Greek), a god of Nubian origin who was first related to the Egyptian gods Osiris and Ra, and later assimilated, in Ptolemaic times, to the falcon god Horus. The god is represented in human form, as a young man (linked to the sun), who wears the crown atef or triple atef Osirian, with a Nubian hairdo, holding on the right hand the stick uas and left anj, being this guarded by a cobra goddess in a vigilant attitude. In the relief we see that numerous cartouches appear, symbols of the royal power and hieroglyphics that would make reference to the ceremonial scene, perhaps inserting prayers or epithets proper of the venerated god.

C/ Sebastian Souviron, 9 29005, Malaga, SPAIN
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info@ifergangallery.es

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